Join us at the European Heat Pump Summit!

Today’s the day! Today the European Heat Pump Summit begins. Don’t miss out to meet our colleagues, Dr. Caroline Haglund Stignor and Dr. Metkel Yebiyo at HPT TCP – Technology Collaboration Programme on Heat Pumping Technologies by IEA.

It starts now and we are finally prepared for receiving visitors coming from all over the world in the safest way possible! We will wait for you at stand 2 at Foyer Expo in Nuremberg with a lot of news.

Join us at the European Heat Pump Summit this week.

We are looking forward to seeing you!

HPT TCP by IEA is now on WeChat

We are pleased to announce that the account for HPT TCP by IEA at the Chinese Social Media platform WeChat is now up and running.

News will be shared on WeChat in the same way that it is on LinkedIn and Twitter. We will be able to provide up-to-date news and information from HPT TCP by IEA.

Follow us on WeChat, for news, upcoming events, and much more by scanning the QR-code.

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  • Scan the QR code with your WeChat account and then click follow.

 

 

 

 

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Release of IEA World Energy Outlook 2021

Solutions to reach Net Zero Emissions are available, cost-effective, and offer shelter for fossil fuel price shocks – heat pumps are one of the highlighted examples

This year’s edition of the World Energy Outlook (WEO), released on October 13, has been designed, exceptionally, as a guidebook to COP26. It spells out clearly what is at stake – what the pledges to reduce emissions made by governments so far mean for the energy sector and the climate. And it makes clear what more needs to be done to move beyond these announced pledges towards a pathway that would have a good chance of limiting global warming to 1.5 °C and avoiding the worst effects of climate change.

The report tells that a new global energy economy is emerging. During 2020, despite the pandemic, renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar PV continued to grow rapidly, and electric vehicles set new sales records. The new energy economy will be more electrified, efficient, interconnected, and clean. However, the transformation still has a long way to go. At the moment, every data point showing the speed of change in energy can be countered by another showing the stubbornness of the status quo. The direction of travel is a long way from alignment with the IEA’s landmark Net Zero Emissions by 2050 Scenario (NZE), published in May 2021, which charts a narrow but achievable roadmap to a 1.5 °C stabilization in rising global temperatures and the achievement of other energy-related sustainable development goals. At a pivotal moment for energy and climate, the WEO-2021 provides an essential guidebook for COP26 and beyond.

Different scenarios are compared in the report. In the run-up to COP26, many countries have put new commitments on the table, detailing their contributions to the global effort to reach climate goals; more than 50 countries, as well as the entire European Union, have pledged to meet net-zero emissions targets. If these are implemented in time and in full, as modeled in detail in IEA’s new Announced Pledges Scenario (APS), they start to bend the global emissions curve down.

However, a lot more needs to be done by governments to fully deliver on their announced pledges. Looking sector-by-sector at what measures governments have actually put in place, as well as specific policy initiatives that are under development, reveals a different picture, according to the report, which is depicted in IEA’s Stated Policies Scenario (STEPS).

Today’s pledges (APS) cover less than 20% of the gap in emissions reductions that need to be closed by 2030 to keep a 1.5 °C path within reach, according to the analysis. In the APS a doubling of clean energy investment and financing over the next decade, but this acceleration is not sufficient. Over the crucial period to 2030, the actions in this scenario fall well short of the emissions reductions that would be required to keep the door open to a Net Zero Emissions by 2050 (NZE) trajectory.

Solutions to close the gap with a 1.5 °C path are available – and many are highly cost-effective

The WEO-2021 highlights four key measures that can help to close the gap between today’s pledges (APS) and a 1.5 °C trajectory (NZE) over the next ten years – and to underpin further emissions reductions post-2030. According to the report, more than 40% of the actions required are cost-effective, meaning that they result in overall cost savings to consumers compared with the pathway in the APS.

Source: IEA. International Energy Agency Website: www.iea.org

 

The four measures are:

  • A massive additional push for clean electrification that requires a doubling of solar PV and wind deployment relative to the APS; a major expansion of other low-emissions generation, including the use of nuclear power where acceptable; a huge build-out of electricity infrastructure and all forms of system flexibility, including from hydropower; a rapid phase-out of coal; and a drive to expand electricity use for transport and heating (i.e. heat pumps).
  • A relentless focus on energy efficiency, together with measures to temper energy service demand through materials efficiency and behavioral change.
  • A broad drive to cut methane emissions from fossil fuel operations.
  • A big boost to clean energy innovation.

IEA states that there is a looming risk of more turbulence ahead for energy markets, but transitions can offer some shelter for consumers against oil and gas price shocks if consumers can get help to manage the upfront costs of change. In a transforming energy system such as the NZE, households are less reliant on oil and gas to meet their energy needs, thanks to efficiency improvements, a switch to electricity for mobility, and a move away from fossil fuel-fired boilers for heating. This will require policies that assist households with the additional upfront costs of efficiency improvements and low emissions equipment such as electric vehicles and heat pumps. As electricity takes up a progressively larger share of household energy bills, governments have to ensure that electricity markets are resilient by incentivizing investments in flexibility, efficiency, and demand-side response.

IEA concludes in the report that the costs of inaction on climate are immense, and the energy sector is at risk. The potential prize is huge for those who make the leap to the new energy economy. Making the 2020s the decade of massive clean energy deployment will require an unambiguous direction from COP26.

Read the Executive summary and the full report here.

 

UK’s home gas boilers emit twice as much CO2 as all power stations – need for policy to rapidly introduce low-carbon heating such as heat pumps

According to a recent country report, the United Kingdom has 26.2 million households, 22 million of which are heated by gas. A study published in the Guardian shows UK’s home gas boilers emit twice as much CO2 as all gas-fired power stations. The finding highlighted the urgent need for a strong government policy to rapidly introduce low-carbon heating such as heat pumps. Moreover, the data also shows that home gas boilers collectively produce eight times as much nitrogen dioxide as power plants. NO2 is an air pollutant linked to tens of thousands of early deaths a year in the UK.

Ministers have promised to publish their heat and buildings strategy before the UN Cop26 climate summit in Glasgow in November.

Source: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/sep/29/uks-home-gas-boilers-emit-twice-as-much-co2-as-all-power-stations-study

This study is a reminder of the critical need to:

(i) invest heavily in technologies such as heat pumps;

(ii) continuously developing the work in international collaboration programmes such as the  Technology Collaboration Programme on Heat Pumping Technologies (HPT TCP) within the IEA, which have actively been a leading player in generating and communicating independent knowledge on heat pumping technologies with 17 member countries worldwide since 1978, and

(iii) introduce strategic governmental mission-driven policies to support the deployment of low carbon technologies.

In September 2021, the UK delegates within HPT TCP led a two-day workshop in collaboration with the IEA Heat Pump Centre to establish a new international collaboration project (so-called Annex) within the HPT TCP for the design and operation of retrofit heat pump systems for large buildings in order to maximize heat pump market penetration. Moreover, several other Annexes aiming at enhancing the development and deployment of heat pumping technologies are, and have been, performed within the HPT TCP.

A 100% renewable society is possible with heat pumps as the heart of the smart energy system – The main conclusion from the EHPA Heat Pump Forum in Brussels

On September 29 EHPA organized the Heat Pump Forum, a hybrid event where the heat pump industry joined forces with the policy-makers as equal partners in reaching their common objectives for green heat recovery. At the same time, the association celebrated its 21st anniversary. The event took place in the magnificent Gare Maritime, in Brussels. The forum aimed to discuss what is needed today to decarbonize Europe’s “heating and cooling” fully and effectively by 2050.

The event gathered 31 thought leaders, including high-level policy-makers, major players of the heating and cooling industry, influencers from related stakeholders who shared their insights throughout the different sessions.

More than 110 participants were present at the venue and over 350 attendees also joined virtually. The diverse program of panel sessions and expert interventions covered heat pump applications for residential and industrial sectors, digitalization, and new business models.

In addition, the conference covered the need for competence in the value chain as well as for simple solutions and an optimized customer journey – a one-stop shop when investing in a heat pump.

The first presenter of the day was Dan Caesar, the main presenter of the “Fully Charged Show”. He gave an outside perspective on how to communicate with consumers. He advised to market heat pumps as cool – they are future-proof, offer max sustainability, are hyper-efficient, provider of heating and cooling can deliver heat as-a-service, and finally, heat pumps should be promoted as the heart of the smart energy system.

In one of the following sessions, it was discussed how the Fit-for-55 package impact industry. The Commission would like to see the heat pump industry boosted in order to reach climatic targets. Therefore, they want member countries to encourage to stimulate the training of installers and to set national targets, not only for electricity but also for heating and cooling.

Thereafter the new energy market design was discussed – why carbon pricing matters. It was stated that if carbon pricing (ETS) is taken out from effort-sharing sectors (including buildings) in the Fit-for-55 package, something else needs to be put in, otherwise the climatic targets will not be reached. The social impact must be considered, by putting the income from ETS into different funds, etc.

One of the afternoon sessions was on the topic “A new industrial strategy for Europe: co-creating with large and industrial heat pumps”. The industrial sector uses 25% of final energy in Europe and 60% is used for heating. However, it was emphasized that industrial clients might differ from clients in the building sector. Industry clients have most of it focus on what they are producing and less on heating and cooling. In addition, reliability is important! These aspects must be taken into consideration when promoting heat pumping technologies to this sector.

In the final session, the new language for heat pumps from a marketing perspective was discussed and it was stated that most successful campaigns to change people’s behavior often

  • deviate from the big companies’ campaigns
  • capitalize on movements
  • are consumer-oriented

The product name “heat pump” could be an obstacle in marketing. Therefore, less focus should be put on what the product does, but instead, emphasize the services it could provide.

The forum opened new doors towards a decarbonized Europe by 2050 and proved that a fully renewable society is possible with heat pumps as the heart of the smart energy system!

Save the date – Annex 53 Q&A Workshop, October 5, 2021

Annex 53 – Advanced Cooling/Refrigeration Technologies – on Heat Pumping Technologies (HPT TCP) by IEA will organize a very interesting Digital Workshop on October 5, 13:00-15:00 CEST.

Please join the IEA HPT TCP Annex 53 Workshop. This workshop will be a Q&A format focusing on questions submitted to fifteen pre-recorded presentations by Annex participants’ R&D projects.

Please be sure to view the pre-recorded videos, presenting research results from this international collaboration project available September 20, and submit your questions. The workshop will allow you to raise questions to the presenters and you are welcome to send the questions in advance. All registrants will receive an email with links to access the videos and to submit questions.

Objective:
Technology solutions for higher efficiency heat pumping/AC/refrigeration systems to minimize energy consumption.

Main technology focus areas:

  • Advanced vapor compression (VC) based systems and components
  • Alternative non-traditional cycle approaches such as magnetocaloric, elastocaloric sorption, and other

Please register to the IEA HPT TCP Annex 53 workshop here >

Please find more information about the Annex 53 – Advanced Cooling/Refrigeration Technologies Development HPT – Heat Pumping Technologies

If you wish to receive the HPT TCP Newsletter, please register here: Heat Pumping Technologies Magazine

New Member Country Reports

On the 7th of September, a successful workshop about member country reports took place. This workshop has been attended by more than 50 participants from all over the world. At this workshop, which was the second out of three this year, France, the UK, the US, and Germany presented an updated view of their national markets.


The first Country Report presentation focused on the development of heat pumps in France. The delegate began by providing facts and figures about the French heat pump market, which has been one of the leading European heat pump markets for several years, with more than 1 million heat pumps sold in 2020. The presentation provided an overview of the buildings and equipment stocks, as well as current challenges in deploying the systems in both existing and new buildings. Policy and financial incentives for addressing these issues have also been considered. An outline of research initiatives ranging from refrigerant utilization to heat pump acoustics has also been identified and prioritized.

The UK delegate discussed the overall background of the UK’s energy system, a market overview of heat pumps, some of the strategic policies that interact with heat pumps, and the development of innovative programs. In total, there are 26.2 million households in the United Kingdom, with 22 million of those being served by main gas. Heat pumps are now a small market in the UK for residential buildings, although they are commonly employed in commercial buildings. Despite the introduction of the Renewable Heat Incentive Intervention in 2014, the present domestic market for heat pumps sales has remained largely stable; however, sales have begun to increase as the new policy clarity emerges and consumer knowledge grows. The majority of market growth is in air-water monobloc systems, which have fewer installation restrictions. According to the delegate, around 300,000 heat pumps are presently installed in homes, while gas boiler sales are approximately 1.6 million units each year. High-level policies include the clean growth strategy 2017, clean growth transforming heat 2018, the government’s 10-point plan energy white paper 2020, which aims to install 600,000 heat pumps per year by 2028, as well as the renewable heat incentive (RHI) and the clean heat grant, which will be the RHI’s successor. The adaptability of the building stock, customer knowledge, the gas/electricity pricing ratio, and the upfront cost of systems remain significant impediments.

The United States was the next country to present its report; the US heat pump industry has been steadily growing since 2010, outpacing competing space heating technologies. Through promising R&D and business advances, the usage of ASHPs in cold regions is becoming more practical. In order to address environmental concerns and rapid increases in cooling/refrigeration demand, current R&D focuses are primarily on advancing the development of (i) more efficient cooling systems, including nontraditional cycles, (ii) alternative or advanced compression cycle technologies, and (iii) lower GWP refrigerant alternatives. Government initiatives, as well as public and private sector incentive schemes, promote the use of more efficient heat pump systems. The stringent minimum standards, R&D, tax credits, and incentive programs will all significantly impact the future of heat pump technologies.

Germany was the last member country to give its report; a considerable number of universities, research organizations, and industrial enterprises in Germany are working on heat pump technologies. Heat pumps account for more than half of all heating systems installed in new buildings. There is even more potential in the building stock; a government scheme rewards property owners who replace older oil-fired central heating systems, which is one of the key catalysts for heat pump implementation. Air to water heat pumps currently accounts for about 80% of the market in Germany. High electricity prices compared to gas and oil, like in the UK, are a significant hurdle for heat pumps. According to their research, roughly 842,000 heating systems were installed in one year in 2020 for new and existing buildings, as well as replacement. Thanks to the government’s support system, the number of heat pump sales have increased dramatically from 100,000 in 2019 to 140,000 in 2020.

At the following links you can find the country reports:

France

Germany

The United Kingdom

The United States


The first workshop on the 1st of June 2021,
where Austria, China, and the Netherlands presented an update of their national markets, is available here.

 

Invitation – IEA HPT TCP National Experts meeting 2021, October 28, Nuremberg

The Technology Collaboration Programme on Heat Pumping Technologies (HPT TCP) by IEA will organize a National Experts meeting on October 28, 09.00-16.30, in Nuremberg, Germany, in conjunction with the European Heat Pump Summit, which will take place on October 26-27 in the same location. You are welcome to participate and to invite other researchers and industry representatives from your country!

The main purpose of the meeting is to develop new ideas and proposals for future Annexes (international collaboration projects) within the HPT TCP. The outcome from a midterm evaluation of the Strategic Work Plan 2018-2023 for HPT TCP will form the basis for the meeting (read more) and the following topics will be discussed:

  • Sector coupling
    • since we need to explore and demonstrate how the technology can enable sector coupling to improve energy efficiency and increase the share of renewable energy in the mix by providing flexibility
  • Solutions where both the cold and the warm sides of the thermodynamic cycle are used
    • since it is of high importance to increase the overall energy efficiency to mitigate increased energy demand and climate change
  • Alternative and new business models
    • to stimulate mass deployment of heat pumping technologies and improve affordability.
  • Digitalization for heat pumping technologies
    • since we need to explore possibilities offered by the developments in this area and learn how to deal with new challenges (e.g. cybersecurity)

In addition, we will present an update about already existing ideas and proposals for new annexes which are under discussion and development within the HPT TCP:

  • Heat Pumps for Drying
  • Heat Pumps in Positive Energy Districts
  • Comfort and Climate Box solutions for warm and humid climates
  • Retrofit Heat Pump Systems in Larger non-Residential Buildings
  • Heat pumps in High-Density Cities
  • Evaluation and Demonstration of actual Energy Efficiency of Heat Pump Systems in Buildings (in collaboration with EBC TCP)

Please register for the meeting on September 20 as the latest. If you have ideas or proposals for new annexes that you want to discuss during the meeting, please inform us by sending an e-mail and we will take that into consideration when outlining the agenda for the meeting.

 

We will follow the situation regarding the Covid-19. In case the European Heat Pump Summit can not be performed as a physical event due to the pandemic but is transferred to an online event, the HPT TCP National Experts meeting will also be transferred to an online meeting.

Listen to the Plenary speeches from the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – recordings available!

The 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – Mission for the Green World (HPC2020) took place on April 26-29, 2021. More than 370 participants from 26 countries attended the conference, listened to meaningful presentations, and had fruitful discussions with experts from around the world on scientific, technological, policy, and market-related issues for heat pumping technologies. Recordings from the opening ceremony and the plenary speeches are now freely available to watch here >

The opening ceremony of the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference was officially held on April 27, including a welcoming address made by Stephan Renz, Chair of IEA HPT TCP, who gave an overview of the TCP.

Plenary Speakers

Six influential plenary speakers presented their views of the role of heat pumping technologies in the energy system and the vision of the heat pump industry. The introduction of global heat pump markets and policies made by the first three speakers was followed by three speakers providing excellent summaries on key heat pump system technologies.

Mechtild Worsdorfer, IEA Director for Sustainability, Technology, and Outlooks provided the opening plenary speech “Heat Pumping Technologies in Clean Energy Transitions”. She spoke of the potential heat pumps have in reducing the carbon footprint. For the Paris Agreement, a 3-pillar action plan consisting of greater deployment rates across all applications, the integration of heat pumps with power systems, and enhancing heat pump technologies were emphasized.

 

Martin Forsén, President of EHPA (European Heat Pump Association) presented the efforts of the European Commission to reach climate neutrality by 2050 in his presentation “The European Legal Framework is Well Set for a Massive Roll-out of Heat Pumps – but More Efforts are Needed”. In his speech, he emphasized how the energy system integration strategy with electrification based on heat pumps will double the share of heating produced by heat pumps by 2030, reaching 50-70% by 2050.

 

Min Soo Kim, President of SAREK (Society of Air-conditioning and Refrigerating Engineers of Korea) and NOC Chair, presented “Korean policy for green world and heat pumping technologies”. He introduced the New Deal strategy of the Korean Government which will invest KRW 73.4 trillion for transitioning to a low-carbon, green economy.

 

Saikee Oh, Vice President of LG Electronics, provided excellent summaries on recent air-source heat pump technologies. He also presented some fundamental bottlenecks as well as the cutting-edge heat pump technology that will overcome them.

 

 

Xudong Wang, Vice President of AHRI (Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute) presented the transition to flammable low GWP refrigerants. The presentation covered the current status of developing relevant codes and standards in the US. It was clear after the speech that more research and efforts are needed to enable a safe transition to low GWP refrigerants in the future.

 

Noboru Kagawa, Professor of the National Defense Academy in Japan, presented experiences caused by health problems and how the pandemic has changed the design of HVAC systems in the presentation “Clean and Safe Air by HVAC Systems – Laws and Advanced Technologies in Japan”. The presentation showed that accumulated knowledge can improve HVAC technologies. An overview of related laws and new technologies in Japan was given.

 

 

The recordings of the plenary speeches are freely available to watch here >

Proceedings from the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – Full papers, can be ordered from our publication database here >

 

Next IEA Heat Pump Conference

The 14th International Energy Agency (IEA) Heat Pump Conference – HPC2023 will take place in Chicago, US on May 15-18, 2023. The theme for the conference will be “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” and it will include workshops, oral and poster, presentations, technical exhibits, a banquet, technical tours, and an evening social event option as well as a spouse/guest program.

Read more here >

Proceedings from the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference is now available at the HPT Website

The 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – Mission for the Green World (HPC2020) took place on April 26-29, 2021. More than 370 participants from 26 countries attended the conference, listened to meaningful presentations, and had fruitful discussions with experts from around the world on scientific, technological, policy and market-related issues for heat pumping technologies.

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the conference was held on both online and offline platforms. The offline venue was the Ramada Plaza Hotel Jeju, Korea. This year’s HPC2020 was unique in not only the hybrid platform but also the program that featured all phases of heat pumping technologies.

The conference was successful, and attendance exceeded our expectations.

Proceedings from the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – Full papers, can be ordered from our publication database here >

The recordings of the plenary speeches are freely available to watch here >

 

Next IEA Heat Pump Conference

The 14th International Energy Agency (IEA) Heat Pump Conference – HPC2023 will take place in Chicago, the US on May 15-18, 2023. The theme for the conference will be “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” and it will include workshops, oral and poster, presentations, technical exhibits, a banquet, technical tours, and an evening social event option, and a spouse/guest program.

Read more here >

New issue of the HPT Magazine is out!

The second issue of HPT Magazine 2021 focuses on Heat Pumps with Thermal Storage.

In this issue, we address the important topic about IEA special report called Net Zero by 2050 – A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector. The report shows that heat pumps and efficient cooling technologies have an important role in reaching the goal.

The topical articles of this issue are all addressing the integration of thermal energy storage in heat pumping and cooling systems. Two different thermal energy storages are covered, and they are both important for the energy system of the future. Storage in the form of borehole systems and thermal storage is integrated as a part of the heating/cooling system of a building. The former solution provides seasonal storage of energy, and the latter solution provides short-term energy flexibility to the electricity grid.

Read the HPT Magazine no 2/2021 here > 

Don’t miss the next issue – Subscribe to our magazine!

 

BS2021 – Building Simulation Conference in Bruges, Belgium

The Building Simulation 2021 Conference will take place as on hybrid physical-online event in Bruges, Belgium on September 1-3, 2021.

This is the place where we want to build a sustainable bridge between researchers and practitioners active in improved performance in the built environment. On the first day, named Impact Day – BS2021 expect the participation of many stakeholders, among them researchers, architects, engineers, practitioners, and policymakers. It will be a true fusion of research and practice, where inspiration, motivation, and drive will help us solve the key challenge we face today – the energy transition. Heat pumping technologies have an important role to play in this transition, especially in the building sector. Registration for this one day only.

A team from KU Leuven, Ghent University, Boyden’s engineering part of Sweco, Daidalos Peutz and IBPSA-NVL organizes, this conference under the umbrella of the International Building Performance Simulation Association (IBPSA), the Building Simulation 2021 Conference in Bruges, Belgium. IBPSA as an association deals with qualitatively predicting performances (e.g. energy use, comfort, noise, indoor air quality, environmental impact, financial costs, etc) of machines, processes, concepts, human activities, etc in the built environment. It is a community (over 4000 members) of academics, Ph.D. students, engineers, and a growing share of practitioners in the sector, with affiliates in 30 countries worldwide. This is their biannual global conference that will take place in Bruges (Belgium) in September 2021. A dynamic team from practice and science, chaired by professor Lieve Helsen (KU Leuven) and prof. Wim Boydens (Boydens engineering & UGent), will shape this event.

You can find more information about the conference program and registration options can on the conference website: https://bs2021.org/.

Save the date – IEA HPT TCP National Experts meeting 2021, October 28, Nuremberg

The Technology Collaboration Programme on Heat Pumping Technologies (HPT TCP) by IEA will organize a National Experts meeting on October 28, 09.00-16.30, in Nuremberg, Germany, in conjunction with the European Heat Pump Summit, which will take place on October 26-27 in the same location.
You are welcome to participate and to invite other researchers and industry representatives from your country!

The main purpose with the meeting is to develop new ideas and proposals for future Annexes (international collaboration projects) within the HPT TCP. The outcome from a midterm evaluation of the Strategic Work Plan 2018-2023 for HPT TCP will form the basis for the meeting. This evaluation showed that all the identified research areas of the HPT TCP are still very relevant, but that we need to focus on some areas and activities during the second half of our strategy period.

The midterm evaluation showed that:

  • More focus should be put on stimulating mass deployment of heat pumping technologies. Therefore, more demonstration and deployment related activities should be performed.
  • Annexes should include work packages where barriers for mass deployment of efficient heat pumps and air-conditioners are mapped and analysed how to be overcome.
  • We should include decision makers (for policy and investments) and (end)users in the analyses since they are important for the acceptance and the efficiency of heat pumps.
  • It is of importance to focus on how to improve affordability to stimulate mass deployment.
  • Since all innovations needed to obtain the climatic targets are not yet developed, activities along large parts of the TRL-scale should be performed, also the lower ones.
  • We should attract new performers/players/industry actors outside the traditional sectors for heat pumping technologies, e.g. ICT, mobility, industry etc.
  • We need to explore and demonstrate the flexibility potential of the technology from several perspectives even more using the possibilities offered by the developments in the area of digitalisation.
    • to balance and stabilize the electric grid
    • to integrate a higher share of renewable energy in the system
    • to enable sector coupling
    • to offer multiple functions (heating, cooling, grid system services) – flexibility of the use
    • to combine different heat/cold sources including ventilation
  • We should focus to a larger extent on solutions where both the cold and the warm sides of the thermodynamic cycle are used.
  • We should continue investigating more efficient affordable and applicable cooling and air-conditioning technologies, especially in warm and humid climates, possible to integrate with other renewable technologies.

Please register for the meeting on September 15 as the latest. If you have ideas or proposals for new annexes that you want to discuss during the meeting, please inform us by sending an e-mail and we will take that into consideration when outlining the agenda for the meeting.

We will follow the situation regarding the Covid-19. In case the European Heat Pump Summit can not be performed as a physical event due to the pandemic, but is transferred to an online event, the HPT TCP National Experts meeting will also be transferred to an online meeting.

New Member Country Reports

On the 1st of June 2021, a successful workshop about member country reports took place. This workshop has been attended by more than 30 participants from the industry, academia, policymakers, investors, and end-users. At this workshop, which was the first out of three this year, Austria, Netherlands, and China presented an updated view of their national markets.


The primary pillars of Austria’s first Country Report were policy-related topics, including various fields of application of heat pump technologies, the development of a mass-market segment for heat pumps, and research development and innovation. The Austrian Climate and Energy Strategy “Mission 2030” aims to use 100% renewable energy in the power sector by 2030. This ambitious objective necessitates increased renewable energy production capacities of 20-25 TWh, primarily from wind, photovoltaic, and hydropower. Heat pumps will also play a significant role in the strategy. The report shows how policymakers, heat pump manufacturers, consumers, and R&D institutions implemented specific recommendations to maximize heat pump market penetration in Austria. As a result, according to 41 Austrian heat pump producers and distributors, overall heat pump sales grew from 43,665 units in 2019 to 47,192 units in 2020. This represents an 8.1% increase. Air-to-water heat pumps are the dominant systems sold with low investment costs and easy installation. Their market scenarios to 2030 show (i) the importance of industrial heat pump research investments, (ii) the net savings on greenhouse gas emissions induced by heat pumps can be increased by a factor of 5.4 by 2030, resulting in savings of 3Mt CO2e by 2030, and, (iii) the potential for up to 3400 new jobs. In 2019, the annual R&D funding for heat pumps and cooling systems was estimated at 3,3 million Euros.

The Netherlands was the second country to deliver its report, which included a market analysis, an overview of mission-driven policy initiatives, and future heat pump targets. Gas-free policies in the Netherlands encourage the use of all-electric and other green heating sources. Existing homes have been designed to switch to heat pumps, district heating, a combination of both. Towards this objective, they’ve developed strong collaborations with municipalities and building owners to develop and scale up Off the Gas affordable and practical solutions. The Netherlands has 7.5 million inhabitants. There are 8 million dwellings, with 7.2 million of them supplied by gas boilers, 400,000 residences are heated by district heating, and roughly 200,00 heat pumps installed to date. Heat pump deployment grew steadily but slowly until 2015; however, when a subsidy scheme for renewable heating was announced, with an average annual payment of 70–100 million Euros going to heat pump consumers, as well as solar boiler and biomass buyers, helped to accelerate the growth. In the Netherlands, air-source heat pumps are the most commonly used systems. A large-scale pilot experiment program with districts going off-gas grid and an extensive grant scheme for heat pumps that will cover up to 40% of the upfront costs and run until 2030 are some of the incentives and national policy missions to encourage heat pump deployment.

The last member to present their report was China, which noted that overall energy consumption had increased from 400 MTOE in the 1970s to 3400 MTOE in 2019. In 2019, however, coal use fell by 57%, while renewable energy grew by 15.3%. The energy mix in China is also evolving, with renewable energy sources making up a larger share of total generation. China has established several measures to promote clean heating in order to improve air quality, with Beijing taking the lead in introducing the Clean Air Action Plan in 2013. Twenty new pilot towns have been added, and the scope of the pilot cities has been broadened to include extreme cold locations, bringing the total number of clean heating pilot cities to 63 in 2021. Such policies have significantly influenced the rapid development of air source heat pumps in recent years. Heat pump technology researches are currently very active in China. China has now become the world’s largest heat pump producer and application market. In order to meet China’s carbon emission reduction and carbon neutralization goals, heat pump heating will become increasingly crucial.

At the following links you can find the country reports:

Austria

China

The Netherlands


The second workshop on the 7th of September 2021, where France, the UK, the US, and Germany presented an updated view of their national markets is now available here