Heat Pump Award 2022 – The application deadline is August 12

Do you have any innovative Heat Pump projects developed at a local level?

Then you can be the winner in one of the 5 categories below:

  • Heat Pump City of the Year
  • DecarbIndustry
  • DecarBuilding (residential and commercial)
  • The lighthouse heat pump project
  • People’s choice award: The most popular HP project

Apply for the Heat Pump Award 2022 – The application deadline is August 12, 2022.

The Heat Pump Award (HPA) is a European Heat Pump Association (EHPA) project which recognizes the most efficient, smart, and sustainable Heat Pump project at the local level.

Both European and International projects compete for the same awards, so regardless of country of origin, any project can participate.

The Heat Pump Award was launched in 2011 to highlight cities and regions that have put in place an energy-efficient project which takes advantage of Heat Pump technology. The international appeal of the award has grown year after year and now attracts participants from all over Europe and beyond.

The project aims to:

  • Collect best practice examples of Heat Pumps in urban areas to present to EU authorities
  • Create role models for those who still hesitate to change
  • Raise people’s awareness of the potential of Heat Pump
  • Recognize the innovative and continuous work in the sector

Read more about the award, and apply here >

 

Nominate your candidate for the Peter Ritter von Rittinger International Heat Pump Award

Every three years the Peter Ritter von Rittinger International Heat Pump Award is awarded in conjunction with the International IEA Heat Pump Conference. The Peter Ritter von Rittinger International Heat Pump Award is the highest international award in the air conditioning, heat pump and refrigeration field.

The Peter Ritter von Rittinger International Heat Pump Award is named for Peter Ritter von Rittinger who is credited with the design and installation of the first energy-conserving heat pump system at a salt works in Upper Austria in 1855. The award highlights outstanding contributions to the advancement of international collaboration in research, policy development and applications for energy-efficient heat pumping technologies.

CRITERIA FOR THE AWARDS
1. An award may be given to a team or group as well as to an individual
2. The contribution(s) shall have been made in heat pumping market development, technology advancement or applications, or administration/organization of heat pumping activities with international involvement or impact.
3. That the contribution(s) of the candidate(s) are truly significant (having made a significant and lasting difference) and are widely recognized as such.
4. That the candidate(s) in fact played a key role in the contribution or achievement.
5. That the candidate(s) persevered to achieve a significant contribution despite difficulties or opposition or lack of support.

Deadline for nomination is November 30, 2022

Welcome to nominate your candidate for the award!

Award Nomination Form
See the list of previous awardees here.
Visit the official webpage for the IEA Heat Pump Conference 2023.

Heat pumps were highlighted at IEA’s Global Annual Conference on Energy Efficiency as one of the most important super-efficient appliances paving the way to Net Zero

IEA’s 7th Annual Global Conference on Energy Efficiency took place on June 7-9 in Sönderborg in Denmark. Energy efficiency is high on the agenda these days, due to the climate crisis as well as the wish to reduce the dependence on Russian fossil fuels. The overall message from the conference is that energy efficiency measures should be the first choice in mitigating both these crises since it results in reduced cost, reduced dependence on fossil fuels and reduced emissions – moreover, they can be implemented right away! In many cases, we do not need to wait for future innovations. Heat pumping technologies were raised as an important part of the solution, both when it comes to the heating of buildings and industries and also for efficient cooling. It contributes to improved energy efficiency as well as an increased share of renewables in the energy system. Thereby heat pumping technologies contribute to increased security of supply!

During the conference, a couple of speeches and presentations were given, but mostly the program consisted of panel discussions where policymakers and representatives from industry, the financial sector and technical experts held fruitful and interesting discussions. Many of the presentations and discussions revealed that actions to increase energy efficiency are not taken often and quick enough, even though the right technology is existing, and the measures would be profitable. The various obstacles, barriers but also solutions were discussed during the days – and to conclude, in many cases partnership and joint actions by policy, industry and financiers would be the key! However, investors need to be informed and educated about the possibilities.

ESCOs – Energy Services Companies

Brian Motherhood, from IEA, started on the first day of the conference. He said that governments from 60 countries, of which 20 on the ministerial level, were present at the conference. He stated that energy efficiency is of high importance, progress needs to double, and investments need to increase. However, governments cannot do this alone, they cannot cover all the investments needed. This is where ESCOs (Energy Services Companies) comes in. They have the right knowledge of what to be done. However, ESCOs cannot operate without the right policy measures in place and not without access to financing for the measures. Thereafter followed sessions about ESCOs and in what way they will be able to contribute to that energy efficiency measures are realized and which type of support they would need from a policy. It could be concluded that in many cases a partnership between ESCOs, the client (building owner or industry), representatives from the financial sector as well as from insurance companies could be the solution. Such partnerships must be able to deal with risks properly and they should be supported by policy. Very often ESCOs have challenges with financing. They get the needed loans for the first projects, but thereafter they get problems since they do not fulfill the normal financing requirements. Often, also their clients meet challenges with investments since energy efficiency is not their core business. To conclude, the financing market is not sufficiently well set for the financing of energy efficiency measures, even though it is a low-risk investment, even though sometimes with longer payback times. In addition, financing alone is not sufficient to solve the problem – aggregators, educators, and regulators are also needed.

Super-efficient appliances pave the way to Net Zero

On June 7, a very interesting panel discussion about Heat Pumps, and what can be done to deploy the most efficient equipment quickly enough, took place in a session titled “Super-efficient appliances pave the way to Net Zero”. Caroline Haglund from Heat Pump Centre was one of the panelists. During the discussion, the audience could learn about the Electric Ireland Superhomes, a one-stop-shop for a home energy retrofit, challenges related to supply chains and the lack of components that manufacturers experience right now and that there is no lack of installers in Europe, maybe of heat pump installers, but installers could be retrained. It was also discussed how finance could be unlocked to enhance the energy efficiency, how to create incentives and that emissions should be controlled beyond reporting. Caroline Haglund Stignor shared in her intervention the success factors behind the phasing out of oil heating in detached houses in Sweden, to a large extent by the installation of heat pumps. To summarize, she concluded that it helps if clean heating is the most economically attractive solution for the end-user, and this can be achieved by the introduction of carbon pricing, adjusting levels of tax, VAT and subsidies. However, often more than one policy measure is needed to transform a market, a combination, and measures that creates awareness and builds confidence in the technology must not be forgotten. Finally, investment in R&D to continue the development of the technology and its systems is of high importance! Thomas Nowak, from EHPA, emphasized in his concluding remark, that the massive roll-out of heat pumps which is envisaged in the IEA Net-Zero by 2050 Roadmap as well as in the REPowerEU communication shall be realized. Policymakers need to set priorities for the technology and establish a Heat Pump Accelerator.

During this session, there was also a deep dive into industrial electric motors, since they are on significant electricity consumer on a global level. At the same time, efficient technology is available but not applied in many parts of the world. A policy solution to this would be to “maximize the minimum and incentivize the maximum” referring to the MEPS (minimum efficiency performance standards).

The value of early action on Energy Efficiency

On June 8, the Minister of Energy from Denmark, Dan Jorgensen, gave an opening presentation. He said that investments in energy efficiency will often pay themself in a few years. Energy efficiency is a win-win-win. It helps us save the planet and we will save money doing it!

Fatih Birol, the Executive Director of IEA, held an opening presentation. “We are in the middle of the first global energy crises – this crisis may be the turning point”, he said. He emphasized the triple benefits of energy efficiency – reduced cost, improved security, and reduced emissions. He also stated that if all countries just had the right energy policies and incentives and apply existing technologies, the world would save the same amount of energy that China uses today. He also talked about cooling. In many countries, cooling is the number one driver of electricity consumption. In Southeast Asia, only 15% have Air Conditioners (AC) and in India less than 10%. The numbers are much higher in Japan and USA. The very tragic fact, however, is that in Southeast Asia an AC requires three times more electricity to give the same cooling as in Japan.

Thereafter followed a panel discussion. Kadri Simson, the European Energy Commissioner talked about the EU has decided to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels from Russia. There are three principles – diversification, accelerating the rollout of renewable energy and saving energy. The higher demand the higher the prices will be. Immediate energy savings can be achieved by behavior. The deployment of heat pumps and the development of sustainable district heating systems is an important part of the strategy to reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. Phase-out of fossil fuel boilers just for space heating would reduce the energy use by 8%. She said that the cooperation between the EU and IEA has been tighter than ever.

During the discussion, it was also stated that the energy efficiency measures would work faster than building new renewables. The two strategies must go hand in hand.

Amina Mohammed, from the UN, talked about the importance of making energy efficiency retrofits of buildings and using excess heat from supermarkets and data centers. This would result in lower cost, lower fuel imports, and lower emissions! Tripe benefits!!

The CEO of Danfoss talked about how they work with energy management at their industrial sites. First, they make sure to use less energy, thereafter they are reusing the energy they have on the site (from ventilation, data centers and production). Finally, they use green renewable energy for the remaining part.

Minister of Energy of Ukraine, German Galuschenko participated via a link in the conference. He told the audience about how they every day repair their energy infrastructure, again and again. More than 5 million have been cut off from the electricity supply and many have no gas in their house. He emphasized that they need more reliable sources – not only NOT from Russia, but also sustainable and low carbon.

Efficient Cooling for Global Development

On June 7 there was also a session about Efficient Cooling for Global Development

The question “How do we meet the rising demand for cooling?” was discussed. It is of importance not to lose the people part of the equations. Cooling is fans, cool chains and Air Conditioners and there was a call for policymakers and industry to collaborate and set common ambitions. On the question “What can be done to make energy-efficient cooling more affordable and accessible for more people?” several answers were given – the design can be changed, 3D printing can be used to enable local production, and R&D is needed, innovation is needed. As much as possible of the equipment should be produced locally.

Another questions discussed were “How can policy tools help us beat climate challenge in your country?” and “What do you want to happen at the next COP meeting related to cooling?” One of the answers given was that all governments should agree on the same ambitious efficiency standards for the most important product groups.AC, refrigeration devices, electric motors, bulbs.

Accelerating policy implementation for resilience, affordability and climate

A panel discussion about accelerating policy implementation for resilience, affordability and climate was held. Kelly Speakes-Backman from DOE, United States, talked about Bidens’ ambitions to cut the emissions by half until 2030 and to have a clean electricity grid by 2035. She said that the case for energy efficiency has never been more urgent since its booster energy security. Representatives from industry, i.e., the CEO of BASF and the CEO of Alfa Laval talked about how they work with decarbonization and energy efficiency in their industries, e.g., to use large-scale industrial heat pumps to produce steam. A concern was also raised about the European regulatory landscape, related to energy – there was a fear that Europe is getting “over-regulated” which will kill entrepreneurship. The regulatory framework should set the floor, and an efficient CO2 price could be the solution, giving a sufficient framework. Decarbonization needs to be a business case to make sense. It is also of importance that policy sponsors the first movers – demonstrations and pilot plants – to reduce risks.

To conclude, quoting Fatih Birol, the Executive Director of IEA “I don’t know any other solution like #EnergyEfficency that can simultaneously address our economic crisis, energy crisis & climate crisis. And it is the reason why at the IEA we say efficiency is the very first fuel”.

Links:

https://www.iea-events.org/energy-efficiency

https://www.iea-events.org/energy-efficiency/session/ce53d871-94b5-ec11-997e-a04a5e7cf9dc

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/caroline-haglund-stignor-70696390_iea-whyee-heatpumpingtech-activity-6940370159840735232K7OP?utm_source=linkedin_share&utm_medium=member_desktop_web

 

Call for Abstract, Final Extension Deadline is June 15, 2022 – 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2023

The deadline for submitting abstracts for the 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference has been extended. 

New Deadline:  June 15, 2022

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Submit your abstracts on the conference website www.hpc2023.org covering the conference theme “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” (250 words maximum). The abstracts will be screened and authors will be advised of acceptance.

Important dates are given below.

  • Abstract submission due May 15, 2022   New Deadline: June 15, 2022
  • Full paper submission due November 15, 2022
  • Final paper submission due February 15, 2023

The 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference will be held in Chicago, Illinois, May 15-18, 2023.

About the conference
Clean, efficient, and reliable energy systems are essential to meeting basic needs for comfortable, secure, and environmentally friendly building environments; food processing, transport, and storage; and industrial processes. Many analysts estimate that it will not be possible to achieve long-term climate, security, and energy goals without increasing the use of renewable heating and cooling hand in hand with large-scale refurbishment and renovation of the world’s existing buildings and industrial infrastructure.

Conference theme: Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient

Heat Pumps, driven with renewable power sources, are the key technical solution for these challenges.

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Please visit the Conference website www.hpc2023.org or the Conference folder.

 

Proceedings from the last Conference in Jeju

As a service HPT TCP present all proceedings (full papers) from the last conference, free of charge. You find them all in the HPT Publication database https://heatpumpingtechnologies.org/publications/

Highlights from the 13th Heat Pump Conference

Please find the highlights of the 13th Heat Pump Conference summarized in Magazine no 2/2021

The deadline is May 31, 2022 for submitting abstracts for the 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Submit your abstracts on the conference website www.hpc2023.org covering the conference theme “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” (250 words maximum). The abstracts will be screened and authors will be advised of acceptance by June 15, 2022.

Important dates are given below.

  • Abstract submission due 15 May  2022  New Deadline:  31 May 2022
  • Full paper submission due 15 November 2022
  • Final paper submission due 15 February 2023

The 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference will be held in Chicago, Illinois, May 15-18, 2023.

About the conference
Clean, efficient, and reliable energy systems are essential to meeting basic needs for comfortable, secure, and environmentally friendly building environments; food processing, transport, and storage; and industrial processes. Many analysts estimate that it will not be possible to achieve long-term climate, security, and energy goals without increasing the use of renewable heating and cooling hand in hand with large-scale refurbishment and renovation of the world’s existing buildings and industrial infrastructure.

Conference theme: Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient

Heat Pumps, driven with renewable power sources, are the key technical solution for these challenges.

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Please visit the Conference website www.hpc2023.org or the Conference folder.

 

Proceedings from the last Conference in Jeju

As a service HPT TCP present all proceedings (full papers) from the last conference, free of charge. You find them all in the HPT Publication database https://heatpumpingtechnologies.org/publications/

Highlights from the 13th Heat Pump Conference

Please find the highlights of the 13th Heat Pump Conference summarized in Magazine no 2/2021

The Heat Pump Market, Research and Policy in Norway

The Norwegian National Team organized a hybrid onsite and online workshop on May the 10th in conjunction with the IEA’s HPT TCP Executive Committee meeting, concentrating on the most current heat pump developments in market, policy, and research. The hybrid workshop was attended by more than 50 participants from 17 member countries around the world.

HPT TCP Norwegian National Workshop

The workshop was opened by the chairman of the HPT TCP, Stephan Renz; he provided a quick introduction to the Technology Collaboration Programme on Heat Pumping Technologies by IEA (HPT TCP) and welcomed the attendees to the workshop. Mr Renz stressed the importance of the national workshop, adding that it provides an opportunity to examine Norway’s energy infrastructure in greater depth by deploying heat pumps to decarbonize the building stock.

Next, Rolf Iver Hagemoen, Secretary-General of the Norwegian Heat Pump Association and delegate for Norway in the HPT TCP Exco, gave a presentation on the heat pump market in Norway. He began by presenting background information about Norway, stating that it is a country of mountains and vast forests, vast empty expanses, and just around 3% arable. The population is over 5.3 million people, with around 1.2 million living in and around Oslo. People are also dispersed throughout the countryside. Sweden, for example, he claims, is significantly more centralized than Norway. Hagemoen emphasized that heat pumps are widely used in Norway; they can be found practically anywhere, even in areas with minus 30 or 35°C weather, in large cities, district heating, and large buildings.

His presentation used an Energy Sankey diagram to show the Norwegian energy system demographics, which show that renewables provide 98 % in Norway, with 1690 hydropower plants accounting for 88% of Norwegian production capacity and 53 wind farms accounting for 10% of Norwegian production capacity. According to Hagemoen, most buildings in Norway are heated by electricity, either directly or through heat pumps, and heat pumps are used by more than half of all houses. Furthermore, Norway’s whole transportation sector is being electrified; for example, 64.5 % of cars sold in 2021 were fully electric, demonstrating that Norway has an energy system that is truly electrified in comparison to many other countries.

He stated that Norway currently has the highest electricity prices ever and that this is due to less rain than normal in the last years and lower filling level in the hydropower reservoirs. The Norwegian electricity system is based on hydropower and is connected to the  European energy system. Higher CO2 and gas prices in Europe cause electricity prices to rise.

When it comes to the heat pump market in Norway, the European heat pump associations put in a lot of effort to understand why some European marketers are strong and others are weak. He cited some of the significant variables that drove the heat pump market, such as the restriction of using fossil oil heating for most buildings since 2020 and increasing CO2 levies for fossil fuels year after year from 2012 to 2020. In addition, incentives were doubled for 2018-2019 to assist people in replacing ageing oil burners with heat pumps. Also, the price difference between electricity and fossil fuels is critical.

In Norway, air-to-air heat pumps dominate the heat pump market, and one of the reasons for this, compared to many other countries, is that there are many buildings without hydronic systems. In countries like Finland, Sweden, France, and Italy, many buildings have direct electric heating and air-to-air heat pumps. Hagemoen provided an overview of the growth of the Norwegian heat pump market, which began in the 1970s and 1980s with various demonstration projects.

According to his presentation, 105,000 heat pumps were sold in 2019, compared to 125,049 in 2021 and 91,894 in 2020, a 36% increase over the 2020 data and a significant rise when compared per capita. When it comes to the heat pump units sold, France and Italy are the leading countries. However, when it comes to per capita, Sweden, Finland, and Norway top the list. One of the major reasons is that Scandinavian countries began electrifying their societies considerably earlier than many other countries. Below is more information about the distribution of heat pumps in Norway.

In the period 1987 – 2020, almost 1.4 million heat pumps were sold in Norway.

  • Air-to-air approx. 1.25 million
  • Air-to-water over 50,000
  • Brine-to-water over 55,000
  • Ventilation heat pumps over 20,000

According to him, if the 2021 heat pump sales data are included, the total number of heat pumps sold in Norway since 1987 rises to over 1.5 million, with more than 1.1 million heat pumps in use, equating to more than 10 TWh of ambient heat.

2021 compared to 2020

  • Air-to-air +38%
  • Air-to-water +2.5%
  • Brine-to-water +8%
  • Exhaust air 29.9%

The second speaker was Synne Krekling, a researcher at SINTEF Community, who spoke about the potential for energy efficiency and heat pumps in Norwegian buildings. She discussed the range of energy efficiency measures, including retrofitting, more energy-efficient windows and doors, heat recovery ventilation, technical equipment, smart control, water-born heating, heat pumps etc.

Laurent Georges, an associate professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), spoke about analyzing energy upgrading projects of single-family houses towards a Norwegian nZEB level. He discussed the OPPTRE project, funded by the Research Council of Norway and led by the SINTEF Community, with NTNU as a research partner. This project investigated the renovation of Norwegian single-family wooden houses towards NZEB. In this context, the cost and energy performance of all-electric heating and ventilation solutions have been compared. Laurent said, most combinations investigated are based on heat pump technologies. According to his presentation, the heating of Norwegian residential buildings used to be dominated by direct electric heating. It was thus important to investigate whether heat pump solutions can compete with direct electric heating when renovated buildings get well insulated. Two houses, taken from an architecture competition in OPPTRE, were used as cases, and it was assumed that the thermal performance of their envelope had been improved significantly. Their research showed that the investment cost for the heat pump and ventilation technology is critical, and the payback time is relatively long. In addition, the combinations of heating and ventilation with the lower investment costs have lower total costs. However, he said that many combinations with an intermediate investment cost, like compact heat pumps and exhaust air heat pumps, are also characterized by lower total costs. He mentioned that they represent a large potential to significantly decrease the electricity use without increasing the total costs for users. The study shows that it is important to account for the uncertainty in the investment cost in the lifecycle cost analysis of small residential buildings and that the uncertainty of future electricity prices (which used to be relatively low in Norway) significantly influences the cost-effectiveness of the heat pump solutions. In addition, their findings highlighted that the lack of a hydronic distribution system in existing Norwegian buildings is a barrier to implementing air-to-water and ground source heat pumps.

Under the title of High-Temperature Heat Pumps based on the international collaboration project (Annex 58), the researchers at SINTEF Energy Research gave a series of presentations. Dr Michael Bantle, a senior researcher, spoke about Electrification by High-Temperature Heat Pump and Dry Ficiency closed-loop heat pumps: Operation experience and outlook. Ole Marius Moen presented findings from an international collaboration project Annex 58: High-Temperature Heat Pumps State of the art, demonstration cases and development perspectives. Christian Schlemminger talked about SkaleUp: Industrial high-temperature heat pump for simultaneous process cooling and heating.

The talk by Kirsti Midttømme, Chief Scientist at the Norwegian Research Centre (NORCE), was titled Geothermal Heat Pumps in Norway and was part of an international collaboration project (Annex 52). Her talk covered an overview of Norway’s geothermal heat pumps. According to her, the prevalence of GHP is continuously rising, with a larger increase projected as electricity prices rise. She presented the findings of the Scandic Flesland Airport’s IEA HPT Annex 52 monitoring project, which reveal that the as-built GHP system at the Scandic Airport Flesland has lower lifecycle costs than the alternatives. She also discussed environmental monitoring of GSHP installations by satellite (InSAR), demonstrating that subsidence caused by the building and operation of GSHP systems can be detected.

Dr.ing Randi Kalskin Ramstad, a consultant at Asplan Viak and an associate professor at NTNU, presented the results of an international collaboration project (Annex 52) at Fjell school in Drammen, Norway, under the title High-Temperature Borehole Thermal Energy Storage (HTBTES) – GeoTermos. She suggested that high-temperature seasonal heat storage in boreholes could be comparable to a thermal battery. She demonstrated that the school’s heating needs were met by “free heating” from boreholes. This allowed them to create a practically off-grid system and had lower peak heat in the winter. According to his presentation, the next GeoTermos will be held at Krokstad elderly home in Drammen municipality. She concluded her talk by demonstrating how scaled, and adjusted systems can have a significant impact on Norway’s energy system, including areas, cities, and industry.

The subsequent two presentations of the workshop were given by Veronika Wilk, a Senior Research Engineer at the Austrian Institute of Technology (AIT); she provided an update on the ongoing international collaboration project Internet of Things for Heat Pumps (Annex 56). And Ellika Taveres-Cachat from SINTEF Community talked about using IoT for Predictive Maintenance of Heat Pumps, and her presentation focused on using predictive maintenance to predict system failures to optimize maintenance efforts, and she used a case study of the ZEB Laboratory to highlight the challenges and opportunities of the method.

And the last two presentations were given by Dr. ing. Jørn Stene, a specialist heat pump and cooling systems at COWI AS, and he spoke about field studies and monitoring of commercial heat pump systems, which was part of the recently completed international collaboration project (Annex 52). Trond Berntsen, a project manager at Fortum Oslo Varme AS, discussed the potential of using heat pumps in district heating to utilize heat from a big data centre.

Find all the presentations on the member country page for Norway here >

 

 

Massive roll-out of heat pumps can reduce reliance on Russian fossil fuels & accelerate the clean energy transition – European policies are revised to stimulate the deployment

The European Commission released the REPowerEU Plan on May 18, along with a number of annexes, including an ‘EU Save Energy Communication’. All documents are available at the bottom of this EC page.

This communication states, among many other things, “Regarding heat pumps, the EU aims to double the current deployment rate, resulting in a cumulative 10 million units over the next 5 years. Member States can accelerate the cost-effective deployment and integration of large-scale heat pumpsgeothermal and solar thermal energy by developing and modernising district heating systems, which can replace fossil fuels in individual heating, and clean communal heating, especially in densely populated areas and cities; and by exploiting industrial heat whenever available. This accelerated deployment should be matched by a fast ramp-up of the production of heat pumps, including through facilitated access to finance.”

The HPT TCP conducts several collaboration projects which will support this accelerated heat pump deployment rate, see, e.g. Annex 50 – Heat Pumps in Multi-Family Buildings for space heating and DHW, Annex 52 – Long term performance measurement of GSHP Systems serving commercial, institutional and multi-family buildings, Annex 57 – Flexibility by implementation of heat pumps in multi-vector energy systems and thermal networks and Annex 58 – High-Temperature Heat Pumps.

The Commission proposes a number of measures in its accompanying ‘EU Save Energy’ Communication to speed up and incentivize the use of heat pumps, including tougher energy efficiency criteria for buildings, which should see the end of ‘stand-alone’ fossil fuel boilers by 2029.  According to the press release of the European Heat Pump Association, “the Commission also includes many other points in REPowerEU which will help speed up the roll-out of heat pumps. These include:

  • Encouraging the Member States to accelerate the deployment and integration of large-scale heat pumps cost-effectively, for example, by exploiting industrial heat
  • Encouraging the Member States to use supporting measures regarding pricing to encourage switching to heat pumps
  • Encourages co-legislators to bring forward the cut-off date for public subsidies for fossil fuel-based boilers in buildings, from 2027 to 2025
  • Creating a new window in the Innovation Fund – which is financed through the EU Emissions Trading System – to support innovative cleantech manufacturing, including heat pumps
  • Proposing increasing the binding energy efficiency target to at least 13% by 2030 based on 2020 levels, from the current 9%.
  • Proposing increasing the renewable energy target to 45% from the current proposed 40%
  • Setting up a large-scale ‘skills partnership’ which should help train up people to work in the heat pump industry.”

According to Clean Energy Wire, the German government outlined plans on Tuesday (17 May) to save more energy due to mounting pressure to reduce Germany’s reliance on Russian fossil fuels.

The plan includes funding and incentives to promote more energy-efficient heating and building standards and the discontinuation of subsidies for gas heating and construction projects that do not meet the new Efficiency House 40 standard.

Renovation of buildings with the lowest energy performance is seen to have the greatest potential for reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. Solar roofs are to become the norm in order to boost renewable energy generation swiftly. While the German government plans to make heat pumps mandatory by 2024, the new work program aims to retrain competent workers in the industry.

A new “Heat pump build-up programme” aims to incentivise workers and companies in the building sector to participate in upskilling programmes. The building sector will also be incentivised to direct more resources into heating renovations, with a focus on the installation of heat pumps.

The government’s objective is to have “more than 500,000” heat pumps installed every year until 2024 and 800,000 per year afterwards when heat pumps become mandatory.

Similarly, the Dutch government intends to ban new fossil fuel-centric heating system installations as of 2026 while introducing the mandatory use of heat pumps or connections to heat networks.

Few countries are as reliant on gas to heat homes as the Netherlands. In 2018, fossil gas covered 71% of residential demand, while the liberal use of greenhouses in agriculture further adds to the situation. Thus, citizens have been hit hard by record gas prices.

The Netherlands will now become the next country in the EU to mandate heat pumps. The “trigger point” for the mandate will be the replacement of a house’s heating installation, like a boiler.

Much like plans in neighbouring Germany to mandate at least hybrid heat pumps as early as 2024, the Dutch government is betting on the efficacy of so-called hybrid heat pumps, which run on electricity for most of the year.

If you want to learn more about hybrid heat pumps, please take part of the reports from HPT Annex 45 -Hybrid Heat Pumps.

 

Read more about the new policies in Germany and the Netherlands on the links below.

https://www.cleanenergywire.org/news/germany-presents-energy-efficiency-work-plan-reduce-fossil-fuel-demand

https://www.euractiv.com/section/energy/news/germany-presents-energy-efficiency-work-plan-to-reduce-fossil-fuel-demand/

https://www.euractiv.com/section/energy-environment/news/netherlands-to-ban-fossil-heating-by-2026-make-heat-pumps-mandatory/

 

14th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2023 – Abstract submission Deadline has been Extended

The deadline for submitting abstracts for the 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference has been extended. 

New Deadline:  31 May 2022

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Submit your abstracts on the conference website www.hpc2023.org covering the conference theme “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” (250 words maximum). The abstracts will be screened and authors will be advised of acceptance by June 15, 2022.

Important dates are given below.

  • Abstract submission due 15 May  2022  New Deadline:  31 May 2022
  • Full paper submission due 15 November 2022
  • Final paper submission due 15 February 2023

The 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference will be held in Chicago, Illinois, May 15-18, 2023.

About the conference
Clean, efficient, and reliable energy systems are essential to meeting basic needs for comfortable, secure, and environmentally friendly building environments; food processing, transport, and storage; and industrial processes. Many analysts estimate that it will not be possible to achieve long-term climate, security, and energy goals without increasing the use of renewable heating and cooling hand in hand with large-scale refurbishment and renovation of the world’s existing buildings and industrial infrastructure.

Conference theme: Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient

Heat Pumps, driven with renewable power sources, are the key technical solution for these challenges.

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Please visit the Conference website www.hpc2023.org or the Conference folder.

 

Proceedings from the last Conference in Jeju

As a service HPT TCP present all proceedings (full papers) from the last conference, free of charge. You find them all in the HPT Publication database https://heatpumpingtechnologies.org/publications/

Highlights from the 13th Heat Pump Conference

Please find the highlights of the 13th Heat Pump Conference summarized in Magazine no 2/2021

Proceedings from the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference is now available at the HPT Website, free of charge

Proceedings are now available, free of charge in our publication database!

The 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – Mission for the Green World (HPC2020) took place on April 26-29, 2021. More than 370 participants from 26 countries attended the conference, listened to meaningful presentations, and had fruitful discussions with experts from around the world on scientific, technological, policy, and market-related issues for heat pumping technologies.

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, the conference was held on both online and offline platforms. The offline venue was the Ramada Plaza Hotel Jeju, Korea. This year’s HPC2020 was unique in not only the hybrid platform but also the program that featured all phases of heat pumping technologies.

The conference was successful, and attendance exceeded our expectations.

All proceedings from the 13th IEA Heat Pump Conference – can now be downloaded, free of charge, from our publication database here >

The recordings of the plenary speeches are freely available to watch here >

Please find the highlights of the 13th Heat Pump Conference summarized in Magazine no 2/2021

 

Next IEA Heat Pump Conference

The 14th International Energy Agency (IEA) Heat Pump Conference – HPC2023 will take place in Chicago, the US on May 15-18, 2023. The theme for the conference will be “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” and it will include workshops, oral and posters, presentations, technical exhibits, a banquet, technical tours, an evening social event option, and a spouse/guest program.

Read more here >

Call for Abstracts – 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference 2023 – REMINDER 2

Only 9 days left to submit your abstract!

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

Submit your abstracts covering the conference theme “Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient” (250 words maximum) .
The 14th IEA Heat Pump Conference will be held in Chicago, Illinois, May 15-18, 2023.

Deadline: May 15, 2022

The abstracts will be screened and authors will be advised of acceptance by June 15, 2022.
Full paper submission is due November 15, 2022, and final paper submission is due February 15, 2023

About the conference
Clean, efficient, and reliable energy systems are essential to meeting basic needs for comfortable, secure, and environmentally friendly building environments; food processing, transport, and storage; and industrial processes. Many analysts estimate that it will not be possible to achieve long-term climate, security, and energy goals without increasing the use of renewable heating and cooling hand in hand with large-scale refurbishment and renovation of the world’s existing buildings and industrial infrastructure.

Conference theme: Heat Pumps – Resilient and Efficient

“Heat Pumps, driven with renewable power sources, are the key technical solution for these challenges.”

The upcoming conference offers an excellent meeting place and will serve as a forum to discuss the latest heat pumping technologies and applications and to exchange knowledge in research, market, policy, and standards information on related technologies. Exhibitions will be held at the conference, to share products and technologies.

More information can be found on the Conference homepage or in the Conference folder.

 

Proceedings from the last Conference in Jeju

As a service HPT TCP present all proceedings (full papers) from the last conference, free of charge. You find them all in the HPT Publication database https://heatpumpingtechnologies.org/publications/

Highlights from the 13th Heat Pump Conference

Please find the highlights of the 13th Heat Pump Conference summarized in Magazine no 2/2021

French Heat Pump Market 2021 Growing Strongly – Thanks To The Government’s Support And The Resilience Of Companies

The sales results of the French heat pump market in 2021 were presented by the French organization UNICLIMA. Following the market’s uncertainty between 2019 and 2020, owing to periods of confinement due to the pandemic crisis, their results show the market is once again growing strongly, thanks to the government’s support and the resilience of companies that have been able to adapt to changing conditions in order to maintain a high level of activity. According to their report, the air-to-water heat pump market reached 267,221 units in 2021, a 52.5% increase over 2020.

When looking at the market for air-to-water heat pumps by capacity, the data shows that all capacity segments have experienced double-digit growth. However, there is more robust growth in the 6 to 10 kW segment +65% (25% of the total market) and +58% for Heat pumps from 11 to 20 kW (55% of the total market), capacity that is mainly installed in the renovation.

Considering the number of building permits and the start of construction of individual houses, their results show that heat pump technology is becoming more and more important in the new market because heat pumps less than 6 kW, mainly installed in the new, are increasing by 27%. According to the latest government estimates, single-detached housing construction started in 2021 increased by 13% compared to 2020 and by only 2% compared to 2019.

According to the UNICLIMA report, high-temperature air-to-water Heat pumps continued to grow in 2021. In 2021, the market for air-to-water heat pumps with a water outlet temperature of 55 to 65° C increased by 57%.

However, over the last quarter, there has been a slowdown. There are several reasons for this trend:

  • Problems with the supply of finished products and/or materials first of the manufacturers were
  • A lack of manpower, companies in the sector are facing recruitment difficulties.
  • The strong growth of the market over the first 2 quarters has led to significant stocking at wholesalers.
  • Some construction projects may have also been

High-temperature Heat pumps with water outlet temperature higher than 65° C are also experiencing a more sustained increase in the latter part of the year than at the end of August (+41% over January to December 2021 compared to January to December 2020 while in 2019, growth was 9%).

According to UNICLIMA’s report in 2021, sales of heat pumps used to heat domestic hot water reached 150,615 units, a new record high of 36.5%. The sales of single-split and multi-split air-to-air heat pumps reached 837,629 units, a slight 3% increase compared to the previous year.

Above Graph – Source: PAC&Clim’Info

Can Heat Pumps free Poland from Russian Gas Dependency? Yes, they can says Poland: A Significant Heat Pump Market Growth Recorded In 2021

The European heat pump markets achieved a major resurgence in 2021 and increasing at an unprecedented rate, despite corona-related restrictions and worldwide supply-chain challenges. According to the European Heat Pump Association EHPA, heat pump sales in the European Union exceeded 2 million units in 2021, and the share of heat pumps in the heating equipment market in Europe is expected to double in the next three years, reaching over 50%. Poland was one of the fastest-growing markets in Europe last year, according to recent statistics.

In 2021, the Polish Association for Heat Pump Technology Development (PORT PC) published a Polish heat pump market research report. According to their findings, the number of heat pumps sold for central heating increased by 80% in 2021 over 2020, while the overall heat pump market increased by 66%. According to their analysis, the most significant improvements in heat pump sales in Poland in 2021 were accomplished in the air/water heat pump market, with 79,000 units sold, an increase of 88% over sales in 2020.

The sales of ground source heat pumps increased slightly as well; however, the number of brine/water heat pumps sold increased from 5,260 to 5,650 units, or nearly 7% more than the statistics for 2020. However, in the area of air/water heat pumps used just for the preparation of domestic hot water, the number of devices sold decreased by nearly 11%, from 8,650 to 7,700 in 2020.

According to the PORT PC report, the key element behind such significant growth in sales of air-to-water heat pumps is the higher attractiveness of solutions and favourable heating costs and the growing trust in this technology among users and installers. Investors’ interest in emission-free heating systems, as well as the comfort of service and growing environmental consciousness, has a substantial impact on demand. The higher intensity of financial support for heat pumps in Poland’s “Clean Air” program from May 2020 and the thermo-modernization relief reflects a clear increase in interest in heat pumps.

The Polish heat pump market outlook for 2022, according to the Polish heat pump association, will be another year of challenges and possibilities for the heat pump industry’s development. Further market growth may encounter a significant barrier related to the lack of qualified installers installing heat pumps. This could be a stumbling block to the market’s continued growth. The PORT PC article emphasizes, the solution used, for example, in Switzerland, maybe standardization and simplification of the assembly of the installed installations, common systems of training installers, implementation of intelligent research and development programs for producers of heat pumps in Poland and monitoring tests of operating heat pumps in residential buildings. A significant challenge is the production of cheap Polish heat pumps, and that it should be as easy as possible to install and start installations with heat pumps. Another important issue is the shortening of the supply chain and the production of heat pump components and accessories. An important issue concerning the development of the heat pump market is the need for an information campaign on the possibility of using a heat pump in existing buildings instead of a coal-fired boiler.

Press release by Assoclima, the Italian association of manufacturers of HVAC systems 2021, an unforeseeable year for the HVAC sector. Record for heat pump and hybrid systems market

On 25th March 2022, Assoclima, the Italian association of manufacturers of HVAC systems, presented the annual statistical report 2021, on the market for HVAC components, with 48 companies participating in the survey. The survey deals with the Italian market data on the production, import, export of air conditioners, split, multi-split, and VRF systems, packaged air conditioners and rooftops, heat pumps and liquid chillers with air and water condensation, air treatment systems, mechanical ventilation systems, terminal units, hybrid systems, and DHW machines.

The national production value in 2021 was approximately 825 million euros, with an increase of 11% compared to the previous year and 4% compared to 2019, while the total of the Italian market exceeded 2.260 billion euros, up 37% from 2020 and 33% from 2019.

According to the Assoclima survey, heat pumps and air-cooled refrigeration units grew by 120% in volume and 130% in value in the size segment below 17 kW in 2021, indicating a noticeable increase in the hydronic industry. Specifically, the turnover of air-water and water-water heat pumps in Italy increased by 107% in volume and 77% in value, respectively, to levels never seen before. In comparison to 2020, the results for hybrid systems were even more impressive, with a volume increase of 352% and a value increase of 390%.

Water source heat pumps and chillers showed a similar trend, though with lower absolute values: +12% in volume and +14% in value for the smaller sizes (below 17 kW); +6% in volume and +13% in value for the 18-50 kW sector. The largest machines increased in volume by 22% and in value by 31%.

Larger sizes also performed well, with a growth of 98% by volume and 62% by value for 18 to 50 kW (+29% in volume and +27% in value) and 51 to 1500 kW (+6% in volume and value), leading to a total sector increase of 98% by volume and 62% by value. Heat pump systems accounted for the biggest share, with overall volume and value increases of 108% and 80%, respectively.

According to the Assoclima survey, the numbers are also growing for Air handling units (up 14% in volume and 17% in value) and mechanical ventilation systems (up 94% in volume and 57% in value). The national revenue for mono-split and multi-split systems was positive in both volume (+23%) and value (+26%), with both products reporting double-digit increases over the previous year: +24% in volume and value for mono-splits and +19% in volume and +28% in value for multi-splits. VRF systems are also on the rise, with volume and value increasing by 26% and 27%, respectively, in 2021, and monobloc air conditioners (+3% volume and +6% value).

In comparison to 2020, mobile air conditioners dropped a few percentage points (-12% in volume and -10% in value), while rooftop air conditioners increased in value (+7.7%) but lost in quantitative terms (-1.4 %).

Luca Binaghi, president of Assoclima, the HVAC Systems Manufacturers Association, commented on the results: “The past two years, which were unforeseeable from a market standpoint, demonstrated that our sector is strategic: at first, the Covid 19 pandemic brought out the awareness that our industry was one of those to focus on, both to accelerate the energy transition process and to support national economies in a very difficult situation,”. Hence the decision by the policymakers to strengthen the incentive tools, with the Super bonus and the transfer of credit on all.

The strategy recently published by the European Commission, REPowerEU, offers an interesting starting point: heat pumps will have to more than double the current rate of installation in the coming years in order to drive an electrification process that can no longer be postponed.

Link to the Original press news >

 

Heat pumps in existing buildings, a blog post series in 12 parts

Today, 75 percent of residential space in Germany is still heated with fossil fuels. In the next two to three decades, these homes will have to be completely supplied by CO-free heating. To make this change, heat pump is the key technology together with CO-free district heating, according to Dr. Marek Miaras’s blog.

In the blog Marek Miara tell us that the more studies, scenarios, and forecasts lay an important, even a crucial, role to heat pumps in reducing carbon dioxide emissions in the building sector, the more often these questions arise: How can heat pumps be used in existing buildings at all? Do all existing buildings need to be extensively retrofitted first? Are heat pumps able to guarantee the high flow temperatures required?  Can heat pumps in existing buildings achieve reasonable efficiency values at all? Is the operation of heat pumps in existing buildings ecological at all?

The aim of the blog post series “Heat Pumps in Existing Buildings”, commissioned by the Stiftung Klimaneutralität in Germany, is to provide well-founded answers to these and other questions, to counteract prejudices and create a good basis for future decision-making. The twelve blog posts are based on the knowledge and experience gained from almost twenty years of heat pump research at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems. During this time, Fraunhofer ISE has, among other things, monitored and analyzed roughly 300 heat pump systems in the field.

“Our research clearly shows that heat pumps can provide the necessary heat even in unrenovated or only slightly renovated existing buildings – at the same time as they are efficient enough to achieve clear ecological advantages over fossil-fueled boilers”, says Dr. Marek Miara.

Dr. Marek Miara

Moreover, we can read in Marek’s blog that the challenge of finding a suitable technical solution and implementing it successfully is greater in some cases than in others. However, these few cases should not call into question the general usefulness of heat pumps in existing buildings. Equally undoubtedly, heat pump installation should become faster and easier, and operation even more efficient and economical. The heat pump industry is already working precisely in this direction.

Find the links to all 12 blog posts with Dr. Marek Miara here >

Marek Miara is the Operating Agent of Annex 50, Heat Pumps in Multi-Family Buildings for Space Heating and DHW, read more here >